Shana Champion, Author at Get Inspired
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Shana Champion

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10 Things to Know About Tamara De Lempicka

She’s been called “the Madonna of the 1920s,” “the Grande Dame of Deco,” and “the steely-eyed goddess of the machine age.” But until the 1960s, Polish-born Tamara De Lempicka (1898–1980) was all but airbrushed from art history. (Pictured above: Autoportrait (Tamara in a Green Bugatti) by Tamara De Lempicka, 1925) It’s not that she lacked talent, admirers or buyers—she had plenty. The problem was with the Roaring Twenties’ art critics. She didn’t fit the mold and,…

Gift Ideas: 7 Masterpieces That Crushed It at Auction

Salvator Mundi, that unassuming Christ figure attributed to Leonardo da Vinci, just shattered the price ceiling for art sold at auction. The final sales price tag? A whopping $450.3 million—and to one very privileged “unknown” buyer. The good news for us average people is that you can purchase a beautifully framed print of this High Renaissance jewel today. In fact, it’s already topping the art aficionado gift-giving charts. But not every art lover on your…

Hygge for the Holidays

Hygge (pronounced hue-guh) is the Danish lifestyle concept that’s taken the world by storm. An untold number of on-trend home decorators have endeavored to replicate this nod to Nordic culture in their own homes—especially around the holidays as more people tuck in for the winter. Wait, how do you say it again? We won’t confuse you with all the wrong ways people are pronouncing this popular lifestyle aesthetic. Instead, here’s an easy way to get…

We’ve Come a Long Way Baby—Except with Abstract Expressionism

I recently visited a semi-major metropolitan city for an Abstract Expressionism exhibit. I was pumped for the art, but also for the chance to introduce my non-art-history-fanatic boyfriend to the first modern art movement to embrace women. We stepped into the special exhibition hall and I went into my customary manic art appreciation mode, rushing around the room and exclaiming in a hushed voice, “That’s a Philip Guston!”, “Check out that Rothko!”, and “This Clyfford…

Masters of Paint Talk Color at a Mock Cocktail Party

Sometimes the world feels pretty black and white. But today, on National Color Day, we’re celebrating all the shades in between. And, to do so, we’re channeling the spirits of some true-blue masters. Imagine for a moment that you’ve been invited to a swanky cocktail party where all your favorite painters from disparate genres are in attendance. You’re sitting between Frida Kahlo and Paul Gauguin, and across from Vincent Van Gogh. Just as you take…

10 Things to Know About Suzanne Valadon

Art history “brownie points” if you’re well-versed on the unconventional life of French painter and vivacious vixen Suzanne Valadon (1865-1938). Never heard of her? Chalk that up to double standards and antiquated notions of propriety. For the most part, Valadon (born Marie-Clementine) didn’t play by the rules. She was a free-spirited Montmartre Bohemian who loved and painted her heart out—not unlike many of her male counterparts. Put Valadon, a bold and talented artist who bucked…

10 Things to Know About Berthe Morisot

“10 Things to Know…” is a new series dedicated to righting HIS-tory by shining a floodlight on extremely talented, yet underrepresented, women in art. Some early accounts of art history leave out glaring details, like the fact that French painter Berthe Morisot (1841-1895) was the only woman to show in the first French Impressionist exhibition. Or that, at one point, she was more successful than Monet and Renoir. Yet, if you ask strangers on the…

Picasso and Peace

Mention Pablo Ruiz Picasso at a party and chances are the conversation will center on his seriously distorted visages, like The Weeping Woman and The Red Armchair. But that’s just one chapter in the book on this Spanish master whose illustrious career spanned 70 years. What’s mentioned less often is his role in politics, as a Delegate at the Paris Peace Conference and in the Peace Movement, in general. While his work sometimes chronicled the…

We See You, Vincent Van Gogh

What do we know about Vincent van Gogh? He’s rumored to have sliced off his earlobe with a razor in a manic frenzy. That’s the first thing that comes to mind for many. It’s dramatic, unfathomable and obviously quite memorable. But there’s speculation as to whether that’s how things really played out that night with Paul Gauguin inside that yellow house in the South of France. There’s even mystery shrouding Vincent’s untimely death at the…

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